**SOLD OUT** Joyce Manor, Quarterbacks, Laura Stevenson (solo)

16
/ Jan
Friday
2015

**SOLD OUT** Joyce Manor, Quarterbacks, Laura Stevenson (solo)

Venue
Front Room
Time
07:00 pm - 11:00 pm
Price
$15.00

Friday Jan 16th

Output Agency Ltd. presents

Joyce Manor
w/ QUARTERBACKS + Laura Stevenson (solo)

$15 || 16+ (under 18 w/ adult) || 7PM DOORS // 8PM SHOW

((( SOLD OUT )))

8:00 Laura Stevenson
9:00 QUARTERBACKS
9:45 Joyce Manor



JOYCE MANOR

Joyce Manor was conceived in the back of a car in the Disneyland parking lot—the kind of beginning California dreams are really made of. It was the fall of 2008 over a bottle of cheap booze when co-founders Barry Johnson (guitar, vocals) and Chase Knobbe (guitar) decided to team up. They formed a power violence band where everyone would have Johnny Thunders-style glam-names … like “Joyce Manor” named after an apartment complex Barry walked past every day. But when longtime friend Andrew Jackson Jihad suddenly asked Barry if his old band wanted to open for their LA show, he scrambled to say yes.

“I was like, ‘We have a new band!’ ‘What’s it called?’ And the first thing I thought of was … ‘Uh, Joyce Manor!’ We didn’t even have a band. But they put it on the flyer.”

——-

QUARTERBACKS [solo] ((https://vimeo.com/94759063))

QUARTERBACKS started as a short-lived duo playing too-fast love songs backed by guitar and a single snare drum. Basement style, old smelly carpets, house shows for punk and patch kids. This was in New Paltz, a college town at the bottom of a mountain in upstate New York. Dean (Dean Engle, the band’s songwriter/vocalist) worked at one of the town’s two record shops, as K Records-obsessed small town boys usually do.

s/t LP out 2/10 on Team Love Records

——-

LAURA STEVENSON [solo] ((http://youtu.be/BVcjzgfOebU))

Some day in the not too distant future, America will dip its corners deeper into the ocean, the waves ever grinding at its shores as tectonic plates shift and sink. The effect of melting icecaps on the beaches of her native Long Island is one of the triggers for Laura Stevenson’s worrying mind, as she struggles with the overwhelming notions of an infinite universe and the imminence of her own death. Obsessive musings on these subjects has led her to describe herself as an “unfunny Woody Allen,” though friends and fans might disagree, finding plenty of humor in her introspective and self-deprecating nature. The repetition of these existential questions is the driving force behind Wheel, an album brimming with life and death in the desperate search for what keeps us turning in the face of doubt, an exercise in coming to terms with the overwhelming beauty that can be found in the lack of an answer.