Doug Tuttle (ex-MMOSS), It’s Not Night: It’s Space, Donny & The Drag

09
/ May
Tuesday
2017

Doug Tuttle (ex-MMOSS), It’s Not Night: It’s Space, Donny & The Drag

Venue
Front Room
Time
07:30 pm
Price
$8 adv / $10 door

Tues May 9th

BSP Kingston presents

Doug Tuttle (formerly of MMOSS 2006-2013)
with special guests It’s Not Night: It’s Space + Donny Dinero

$8 adv / $10 door | 18+ | 7:30 Doors / 8PM Show
Tickets :: http://bit.ly/2lJQcNp



Massachusetts songwriter Doug Tuttle returns with his third solo album, “Peace Potato”, to be released 5th May on Chicago label Trouble In Mind Records.

His 2013 solo debut (after fronting his longtime psychedelic band, MMOSS) was an insular and foggy psychedelic masterpiece punctuated by Tuttle’s stinging guitar leads, accented by flashes of bedroom Fairport /Crazy Horse brilliance, towing the line nimbly between elegance and ragged assurance. We last saw Tuttle on “It Calls On Me”, his 2015 sophomore album, which pushed his songwriting towards further clarity and melody; “Peace Potato” shakes it all down with Tuttle’s strongest batch of songs yet.
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“On ‘Our Birth Is but a Sleep and Forgetting’ (2016, Small Stone Records), the veteran instrumental New Paltz dark psych/rock trio It’s Not Night; It’s Space does in fact come speaking of love, though a different kind of love from Sade’s or Cole Porter’s. This is not voiceless or wordless music per se.

Kevin Halcott’s rainbow of blooming, saturated, reverberated, filtered and E-bowed guitar sounds, arrayed in Spartan-but-artful counterpoint, is the first sound among equals in the democratic INNIS mix. Bassist Tommy Guerrero’s riff commitment is spiritual and simply unshakable. But in my opinion this band’s secret weapon (and I was there at their first performances at Adam Roufberg’s open mic at Oasis in New Paltz at the turn of the decade) has always been the off-genre, curiously distinctive drumming of Michael Lutomski. It is by virtue of his deep and laggy Nick Mason pocket, his flitty, retro psychedelic moves and the pure tonefulness and the variety of glancing sounds in his playing that – no matter how sludgy it gets (plenty) – INNIS never, ever strikes me as a metal band.” -Almanac Weekly

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Born and raised in the land of american music.